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REED-L  July 1994

REED-L July 1994

Subject:

Biographies (286 ll)

From:

"A. Young" <[log in to unmask]>

Reply-To:

REED-L: Records of Early English Drama Discussion

Date:

Wed, 6 Jul 1994 16:09:08 -0400

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (286 lines)

Audrey Becker
[log in to unmask]
 
I am a PhD candidate (4th year) at the University of Michigan.  My
dissertation is on the representation of maternity and mortality in
English Renaissance drama.  I am also interested in performance of
Renaissance drama (the history of performance of Shakespeare, for
instance) and am currently acting in a production of Love's Labour's
Lost.  I don't have much background on music of the period other than
songs of Shakespeare's plays.  The address for REED-L was embedded in
a forwarded message announcing the creation of another e-mail list.
=====================================
 
Anne Brannen
[log in to unmask]
 
I'm currently an Assistant Professor of English at Duquesne
University, where I was hired as a medievalist, though I also teach
contemporary Irish literature. For my dissertation, at Berkeley, under
Alan Nelson, I transcribed the Bassingborne, Cambridgeshire,
churchwarden accounts, and researched the parish (using wills,
terriers, inventories, etc., and creating an index of the
parishioners) -- and then discussed the St. George play they put on in
1511.
 
REED recently accepted my proposal to edit a cambridgeshire vollume of
the Records, so I'll be following up that earlier work.
 
And I can't remember now how I found out about reed-l; I've been on a
Gaelic list for a while, keeping up with my Irish, and knew that
medieval lists must exist and have been trying to find them, a friend
in San Francisco sent me info on how to get on lists and the names of
soome lists he thought I might be interested in, and reed-l was one of
them -- I Think that was it.
 
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
 
Jon Connolly
[log in to unmask]
 
I heard about REED-L on SHAKESPER, the Shakespeare-related list. I'm a
graduate student at the University of California, Santa Barbara, in
the English department.  I have an M.A. from UCSB (93) and a B.A. from
Furman University (90).  I'm presently putting together a dissertation
prospectus on militarism, military culture, and Elizabethan and
Jacobean Drama (although I might have a chapter on early Elizabethan
romances). I'm especially interested in Webster and Middleton.
===============================================
 
Priscilla Finley
[log in to unmask]
 
I'm Priscilla Finley, a Ph.d. student at SUNY Binghamton. As of summer
94 I am finishing up exams and working toward preparing my
dissertation prospectus. I am more interested in Eliz/ Jac. drama than
the earlier material, but I am always interested in hearing about
theatrical practices and traditions.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
 
Peter H. Greenfield
Associate Professor of English
English Department
University of Puget Sound
Tacoma, WA  98416
E-mail: [log in to unmask]
 
Publications:
RECORDS OF EARLY ENGLISH DRAMA: GLOUCESTERSHIRE, ed. (pub. with
Cumberland and Westmorland, ed. Audrey Douglas). University of Toronto
Press, 1986.
"'But Herefordshire for a Morris-daunce': Dramatic Records and the New
Historicism" (review article), ENVOI 3:1 (Spring 1991), 14-23.
"Faith and Prosperity: Cultural Values in Medieval Drama," in
APPROACHES TO TEACHING MEDIEVAL DRAMA, ed. Richard Emmerson (NY:
Modern Language Assoc., 1990), 101-105.
"Professional Players at Gloucester: Conditions of Provincial
Performing," in ELIZABETHAN THEATRE X, ed. C.E. McGee (P.D. Meany,
1988), 73-92.
"'All for your delight/we are not here': Amateur Players and the
Nobility," RORD 28 (1985), 173-181.
"Entertainments of Henry, Lord Berkeley, 1593-4 and 1600-05," RECORDS
OF EARLY ENGLISH DRAMA NEWSLETTER 8:1 (1983), 12-24.
Reviews of books on medieval and Renaissance drama in SHAKESPEARE
YEARBOOK, PHILOSOPHY AND LITERATURE, and THE EARLY DRAMA, ART, AND
MUSIC REVIEW.
 
For the past two years I have been editor of the Medieval Supplement
section of Research Opportunities in Renaissance Drama, and especially
encourage REED-L subscribers to e-mail brief notices of medieval and
(non-Shakespearean) Renaissance drama productions to me for inclusion
in RORD ([log in to unmask]).
  My current research includes editing the records of Hertfordshire,
Bedfordshire and Hampshire for the Records of Early English Drama
project. My work on these counties, as well as Gloucestershire, has
led me to explore various aspects of provincial touring, incl. motives
for touring (financial and political), and the reception of itinerant
players in provincial towns and households.  I am currently at work on
a chapter on touring for a new reference work on early drama, as well
as a conference paper on the carnivalesque in parish drama.
======================================
 
Erin E. Kelly
Graduate English Department
University of Maryland at College Park
[log in to unmask] (erin_e_kelly)
 
My name is Erin Kelly and I am on the verge of receiving a master's
degree in English from the University of Maryland at College Park.
After May, all that will be left to complete is my thesis.
 
It is because of my thesis project that I contacted the REED list. I
am writing about Inns of Court drama in the 1560s. The plays I am
concentrating on are Gorboduc, Jocasta, Supposes, Gismond of Salerne
and Damon and Pithias. I have run across REED research footnoted in a
number of my sources; an advisor of mine suggested that someone on
your list might be able to recommend resources; finally, someone on my
committe recalled that one of the current REED volumes in progress may
be on the Inns of Court. In sum, I hope that the REED list will
somehow be useful for my current work.
 
Now to contextualize this project within some of my more general
interests. I have spent time researching and studying early Tudor
drama, Shakespearean and Shakespearean era drama, and Jacobean court
masques. I am currently expanding my reading to include late medieval
English drama, especially Corpus Christi plays and morality plays. I
am especially interested in how religious controversies and social
environments affected the production of drama (as text, performance,
commodity, etc).
 
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
 
Sharon Kraus
[log in to unmask]
 
I am a graduate student in the English Dept. of CUNY; my interests are
in medieval drama, particularly the mystery plays (even more
particularly, York's Corpus Christi cycle).
I learned of the existence of the REED-L list from a mention in a
message on (I believe) interscripta. I've just come back to town after
a 2-week absence though, so my memory of that message's origin has
faded. I look forward to being a member of this list.
=========================================
 
Avraham Oz
[log in to unmask]
 
Avraham Oz was born in Tel Aviv and holds degrees from the
universities of TelAviv and Bristol(PhD). He has taught at Tel Aviv
University (where he was also head of the Theatre Arts department),
The University of Haifa where he is now head of Theatre Studies),The
"Beit Zvi" School of Dramatic Art; lectured at the Hebrew University
in Jerusalem, served as associate artistic director at the Cameri
Theatre of Tel Aviv and dramaturg at the Haifa Municipal Theatre, and
had a weekly show on the Israeli radio. His Books include "The Yoke of
Love: Prophetic Riddles in The Merchant of Venice," (University of
Delaware Press, 1994) and colections of essays on Marlowe (forthcoming
from Macmillan) and Shakespeare (forthcoming from U of Delaware
Press). Oz founded and edited ASSAPH: THEATRE STUDIES and published
extensively on early modern drama and political theatre. He is the
general editor of the Hebrew edition of Shakespeare, and his Hebrew
translations of Shakespeare, Brecht, Pinter, and others (Shakespeare's
plays including THE MERCHANT OF VENICE, AS YOU LIKE IT,CORIOLANUS,THE
TEMPEST,ROMEO AND JULIET,KING LEAR and JULIUS CAESAR) have been
performed by all major theatres in Israel.
 
Home Address: P.O.Box 14358, 61142 Tel Aviv, Israel.
telefax:+972-(0)3-5609627.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
 
Victoria Plaza
[log in to unmask]
 
I read about the REED network in _Medieval and Renaissance Theatre_.
I am a Ph.D. candidate at the U. of Maryland, currently working on the
works of the Thomas More "Circle" playwrights:  Henry Medwall, John
Heywood, John Rastell, and John Redford.  I look forward to hearing
more about your network...
==================================
 
Andrew Ryder
[log in to unmask]
 
I am a graduate student in Theatre at Michigan State University
finishing my MA Thesis about the production potential of the N-town
Passion.  I spent last weekend at Kalamazoo and came home inspired.
 
I hope this is the correct place to subscribe--I would like to be able
to keep in touch with this group.
==================================
 
Arvid Sponberg
[log in to unmask]
Valaparaiso University
Editor, American Theatre and Drama Society Newsletter
 
I am a professor of English at Valparaiso University in Valparaiso,
IN. My research interests include the history of the profession of
playwright in the United States, a topic which necessarly includes a
history of the profession in Great Britain. I am especially interested
in the mutual influence of artistic and management decision making on
playwriting and the patterns and customary habits of decisionmaking in
the English-speaking theatre.
 
I'd seen references to REED-L on other theatre lists but I decided to
request a subscription after reading Bill Ingram's book on The
Business of Playing and corresponding with him about patronage,
management of playhouses and similar topics. I would like to find out
why some patrons supported acting companies and others didn't. It was,
and still is, an odd thing to do when viewed in the context of a
general population. Bill suggested that persons on REED-L might shed
light on this question. Bill sent me a copy of Leeds Barroll's
Configuring the Patronage of Later Elizabethan Drama which treats the
motives of peers who "could influence the careers of dramatic
troupes." That article gets at some of the questions I have but leaves
out the matter of, for example, whether peers who were not theatrical
patrons approved or disapproved of theatrical patronage, or whether
they had any opinions at all on the subject. At the best of times,
theatre management is an untidy business, so, apart from being
irretrievably stagestruck, why would one do it, especially if one's
peers (in both senses) think it's a stupid idea. Or was being
stagestruck a sufficient motive in Elizabethan times, just as it is
for some people today. And if so, how and under what circumstances did
the Earl of Derby, say, become stagestruck? And if he was stagestruck,
did he leave behind any documents testifying to and about the fact?
 
That's my agenda.
====================================
 
Greg Walker.
[log in to unmask]
 
I am currently Lecturer in medieval and early Renaisance literature at
the University of Leicester, having previously been a lecturer at the
University of Queensland (Australia) and, before that a British
Academy Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Southampton.
 
My Ph.D. was on the Political aspects of John Skelton's poetry (Later
published by Cambridge U.P. as John Skelton and the Politics of the
1520s (1988). I have since published Plays of Persuasion: Drama and
Politics at the Court of Henry VIII (also Cambridge, 1991), and a
number of articles on early Tudor and Scottish drama, including a
piece on Lindsay's Ane Satire in the Scottish Literary Journal and a
forthcoming co-authored piece on Gorboduc.
 
In research terms I am esentially a Tudor historian with a strong
interest in literature and drama, and am continuing to write essays on
Tudor history in addition to a second book on drama: Renaissance
Drama: The Politics of Performance (covering household drama, John
Heywood, Gorboduc and Lindsay thus far).
I heard of REED-L via METH to which I subscribe, and via my good
friend John J. McGavin at Southampton, who is working on REED for
Scotland, and is already a subscriber.
======================================
 
Suzanne Webb
[log in to unmask]
 
I am professor of English at Texas Woman's University where I have
taught for the last 22 years. I have been interested in early drama
since I studied with John Wasson at Washington State in the early
seventies. I have been teaching a graduate course in Medieval Drama
about every other year and several years ago gave a paper on N-town at
MLA. I have attended several of the PLS productions of the
cycles--Chester, Towneley, N-Town--and produced the shepherd's play
for the N-town cycle when Andrew Taylor was organizing the production.
Most of my time, however, goes to support Texas Woman's University's
PhD program in rhetoric, and in particular, the rhetoric/composition
courses and the linguistics/advanced grammar--where most of my
publications are. Teaching Medieval Drama is a treat I get every now
and then. I found Reed-L though Ansax-L, to which I belong.
=====================================
 
Dr Diana Whaley
School of English
University of Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 7RU. England
Tel: (091) 222 7756;  Fax: (091) 222 8708
[log in to unmask]
 
Thank you very much for the information about REED-L and PERFORM. Although
by no means a mainstream 'drama person' I would very much appreciate being
added to the REED-L list. My research is mainly in Old Norse studies, in
fact, with a strong sideline in place-names; but medieval drama is a great
love (something to do with being a native of York) and I teach an
undergraduate module in it, and am offering a further course within an M.A.
which comes on stream this autumn.

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