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CASLL-L  April 1996

CASLL-L April 1996

Subject:

Life On The Internet Press Release (April '96) (fwd)

From:

Marcy Bauman <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Fri, 5 Apr 1996 10:58:12 -0500

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (137 lines)

Thought some folks might be interested in this . . .

Marcy

Marcy Bauman
Writing Program
University of Michigan-Dearborn
4901 Evergreen Rd.
Dearborn, MI 48128

email:  [log in to unmask]

---------- Forwarded message ----------

Date: Fri, 5 Apr 1996 10:17:40 -0500
From: DEOS-L : ACSDE <[log in to unmask]>
To: Multiple recipients of list DEOS-L <[log in to unmask]>
Subject: Life On The Internet Press Release (April '96)

From: Eric Snyder <[log in to unmask]>

http://www.pbs.org/april96/internetaprilpr.html
    LIFE ON THE INTERNET

April 1996

(check local listings)

The "Age of the Internet" has arrived and already it touches virtually every
aspect of life - from medicine and religion to entertainment and publishing.
It has affected the way people communicate and how they relate to one
another, and has raised sensitive issues of privacy and national security.

In April 1996 (check local listings), PBS presents LIFE ON THE INTERNET, a
new 13-part series about the World Wide Web and the millions of people who
use it every day. Each half-hour episode centers on a single topic,
approaching it with depth and focus. Scott Simon of National Public Radio's
"Weekend Edition Saturday" hosts.

LIFE ON THE INTERNET presents a personalized tour of the Net, introducing
viewers to some of the original navigators of the Web and to individuals
whose lives and work have been changed by the Internet: entrepreneurs,
doctors, publishers, teachers, musicians, bankers, parents and children. The
series makes the Net accessible to those who are simply curious about it and
also appeals to those experienced with the Web. In a world where the
Internet is advancing at high speed, LIFE ON THE INTERNET tells the stories
of today and tomorrow.

   * "Digital Doctors" The medical profession has discovered the Internet as
     a powerful tool to speed diagnoses and exchange treatment plans. One
     doctor has even identified a whole new condition: Internet Addictive
     Disorder - what can happen when people spend too much of their lives on
     the Internet.

   * "HollyNet" Hollywood's heart, it has been said, is the place just below
     its wallet. It's not hard to imagine what happened to its heart rate
     when Hollywood discovered the marketing potential of cyberspace. Josh
     Greer is helping to bring the big screen to the desktop.

   * "Next Stop - The Future" The future of the Internet points to its
     continued growth in practical usefulness - eventually becoming a
     ubiquitous fixture in everyday life, quite possibly as common a
     household utility as the telephone.

   * "Cyber Students" In education, like other areas on the Internet, the
     impetus has come from the grassroots up, not from the top down. The
     education establishment is now discovering that individual schools,
     educators and parents are simply no longer prepared to wait for the old
     system to catch up and introduce the Internet in a traditional,
     widespread and orderly manner.

   * "Sounds from Cyberspace" In space, there is no sound. Not so in
     cyberspace, where new audio Net technologies promise to let people hear
     the world's chorus and become their own broadcasters.

   * "Internauts" No one is native to cyberspace; everyone is an immigrant,
     and the newcomers are colonizing the Net in droves. But with whom,
     exactly, are people sharing their dual citizenship, and how are
     citizens changing the face of the Net?

   * "Net Profits" Online sales were expected to reach $1 billion by the end
     of 1995. Out of the thousands of hopeful "cyberpreneurs," who will make
     it and how will they do it?

   * "InterNetworking" Newsgroups are the town square of the Internet, a
     place where literally millions of people gather to debate, preach, get
     information or just leave a message for anyone who cares about the same
     subject.

   * "Electric Ink" In the fiercely competitive world of magazine
     publishing, only the smart and strong survive. In the seemingly
     non-hostile environment of cyberspace, can electronic magazines escape
     the laws of Darwin?

   * "Cyber Secrets" Law enforcement agencies say that in the wrong hands,
     PGP (Pretty Good Privacy), an e-mail encryption software, threatens the
     public good. Its author, Phil Zimmermann, says it's about anyone's
     right to personal privacy.

   * "Electronic M@il" E-mail has changed the way people live and work. This
     episode explains how a particular software author helped make it easy
     for millions of people to communicate with each other.

   * "Spiritu@l Surfers" From official religions with millions of followers,
     to sites for potential cults still looking for their first converts,
     the Internet offers a spiritual smorgasbord for hungry, curious or
     questioning cybersouls.

   * "Digital Dollars" Electronic cash has already entered the flow of money
     that "makes the world go 'round." But are people ready to take the
     final step and open their wallets to cyberspace?

LIFE ON THE INTERNET is a production of Georgia Public Television and
Cochran Entertainment. Executive producers: Andrew Cochran and Ken Daniel.
Producers: Andrew Cochran, Robert Duncan, Rae Hull and Melissa Sykes.
Director: Melissa Sykes. Writers: Robert Duncan and Danny Schnitzlein.
Executive in charge of production: Kent Steele.

Funding is provided by Sun Microsystems.

  PBS Online || Search || Programs || Stations || Store || Email PBS || PBS
                                  Previews

                       If PBS Doesn't Do It, Who Will?

=============================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================================
              TARGETED COMMUNICATION MANAGEMENT
      " Enhancing Corporate Communications with Technology "
[log in to unmask] (Eric Snyder); 613) 722-3751; Fax: (613) 722-7981
=============================================================================================================================================================  http://www.tcm.com/  =============================================================================

   ----------------------------------------------------------------------
DEOS-L is a service provided to the Distance Education community by
The American Center for the Study of Distance Education, The Pennsylvania
State University.  Opinions expressed are those of DEOS-L subscribers,
and do not constitute endorsement of any opinion, product, or service by
ACSDE or Penn State.

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