LISTSERV mailing list manager LISTSERV 16.0

Help for CASLL-L Archives


CASLL-L Archives

CASLL-L Archives


CASLL-L@LISTSERV.UTORONTO.CA


View:

Message:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Topic:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

By Author:

[

First

|

Previous

|

Next

|

Last

]

Font:

Proportional Font

LISTSERV Archives

LISTSERV Archives

CASLL-L Home

CASLL-L Home

CASLL-L  October 1996

CASLL-L October 1996

Subject:

Here's the Call for Proposals for Inkshed 14

From:

Inkshed Working Conference 14 <[log in to unmask]>

Date:

Wed, 16 Oct 1996 09:18:12 AST

Content-Type:

text/plain

Parts/Attachments:

Parts/Attachments

text/plain (180 lines)

                       CALL FOR PROPOSALS
                 Inkshed Working Conference 14:

                      Reading Technologies

 May 1-4, 1997; Geneva Park Conference Centre, Orillia, Ontario


*What "Reading Technologies" means*

At this conference we're going to focus on the ways technologies
(old and new) shape the processes of reading and writing.  We're
particularly interested in examining electronic environments. In
the title, we're using "reading" in at least two senses:

     * In the strict sense of the kinds of reading technologies
     available ("reading" as an adjective). What kinds of
     technologies for exchanging texts (from marks on paper to
     telephone lines, from books to the Web) now exist, and how
     have they shaped reading and writing -- and what new
     technologies are emerging, for instance, as a result of
     computer networks?  How do the technologies we use when we
     read texts (whether those texts be in a book, journal,
     magazine or newspaper, or on a computer screen, perhaps via
     the Internet) affect and shape our reading? How does the
     technology of reading shape the ways we write?

     * In the sense of what we're doing when we're reading
     technologies themselves ("reading" as a verb). How do the
     techologies we use affect or determine who gets to read and
     write, whose voices get heard and attended to?  What
     cultural assumptions are implicit in or enacted by the
     technologies the technologies we use to read and write?
     How do the technologies shape our sense of who our readers
     are, and what role we play as writers? How do they change
     the learning of reading and writing?


*Thirteen ways of looking at a conference*

You're probably aware that the Inkshed working conference has a
history of stretching the limits of what a conference is, of
rethinking tacit definitions and unspoken assumptions.  Inkshed
14 will be no exception.  We want to give you some sense of what
we anticipate the conference will be like, so that you have some
sense of the range of proposals that would fit (both thematically
and in terms of presentation format).

At Inkshed 14 we want to _enact_ some of the range of reading
technologies we're talking about.  We imagine a conference where
whole-group activities (presentations, inkshedding, Talent Night,
you name it) punctuate extended periods of, well . . . Sustained
Silent Reading.  Attendees will have a chance to read texts
prepared by other conference participants, as well as texts
written by people not in attendance.  There will be substantial
amounts of time to sit in comfortable chairs reading.  If you
attend, we expect you to bring your fuzzy slippers and your
favorite coffee mug . . .

Additionally, texts will be available in a variety of formats:
some texts will be available as the customary printed documents,
some as computer diskettes accessible by a variety of programs,
some will be available via the World Wide Web, some will appear
as posters, and others will appear in ways we haven't thought of
yet.  You'll also have as many chances as we can arrange to sit
in front of a computer screen reading or writing.  In other
words, at the Inkshed 14 conference you will have access to as
many reading technologies as we can make available for trial,
use, demonstration and critique during and between conference
sessions.

And, naturally, we expect that there'll be a good deal of
inkshedding at this conference, both in whole-group sessions in
response to presentations, and by people responding individually
to texts that they've read during the conference.  In fact, such
individual reading and responding will form the basis of some of
the whole-group presentations.

What we _don't_ expect is the traditional technology by which
texts are presented -- the conventional 20 minutes of oral
reading, or even full frontal paraphrasing.  If you're
comfortable with that format and would like to use it, we'd
welcome your proposal -- but we'd like to talk with you about
alternative methods of presenting your text and having it
attended to and discussed.

To get you started thinking about what you might propose, here
are some possibilities for presentation technologies:

     * write a paper and circulate it at, or in advance of, the
     conference, and engage in a discussion of it at the
     conference

     * set up a poster and create an "activity center" for study
     and research and conversation on the ideas you're concerned
     with.

     * create a "poster session" online -- for instance, as a
     local URL on a portable PC; participants could play with it
     without the time constraints and problems of trying to get
     an Internet connection

     * structure an exercise, where participants would do
     something within a certain time period, or continuing
     throughout the conference, and Inkshed about it

     * set up a session whereby participants could experience a
     particular kind of technology for the exchange of texts -- a
     MOO session, or an electronic discussion forum.


*Delivering a paper*

It's important, however, to keep a firm grip on the baby while
we're getting rid of the bath water.  At Inkshed 14 accepted
proposals will be listed in the program as presentations, and
will be shared and discussed -- and in more depth and detail than
is possible in a conventional "read a paper in twenty minutes and
answer a couple of questions at the end" conference format.

We invite, then, analytic papers, participatory demonstrations
and explorations, poster sessions, case study reports, and other
forms we haven't thought of.  Proposal should be concerned with
ways in which new and old technologies for exchanging texts
affect either the processes or the products of writing.  We'd be
particularly interested to have collaborative proposals.


*Sending us a proposal*

First.  We need to talk.  We want to hear ideas about what you'd
like to propose -- fuzzy ideas, half-formed notions, whims -- and
we intend to provide as much help as we can reasonably give you
in developing not-so-traditional formats for presenting those
ideas.  This is not a traditional agonistic competitive paper
call.  Your document will not be blind reviewed by a reader eager
to find a way to turn away two-thirds of the proposals.  The
organizing committee sees its job as including as many proposals
as we can fit in.  We also expect that since what we're asking
you to do is so unconventional, it will take some time for you to
figure out how your ideas might shape and be shaped by the
conference.

So, if you're interested in proposing something for Inkshed 14,
we'd like to hear from you (and the sooner the better).  By
November 15, we need to have a paragraph or so from you about
your possible topic, as well as some idea about the format you
envision presenting it in.

By December, you'll need to have your proposal written in SSHRC-
speak.  Information about this deadline will be forthcoming.

You can send your proposal or your suggestion to the whole
organizing committee at this email address:

    [log in to unmask]

Or you can write individuals at the following addresses:

Russ Hunt:          [log in to unmask]
Marcy Bauman:       [log in to unmask]
Margaret Procter:   [log in to unmask]
Andrea Lunsford:    [log in to unmask]
Mary-Louise Craven: [log in to unmask]
Roger Graves:       [log in to unmask]

Or you can send a proposal by paper mail to either (depending on
your national postal predilections):

     Russ Hunt                                       Marcy Bauman
     Department of English                        Writing Program
     St. Thomas University      University of Michigan - Dearborn
     Fredericton, New Brunswick               4901 Evergreen Road
     E3B 5G3                            Dearborn, Michigan  48128


 Inkshed Working Conference 14
 St.Thomas University
 Fredericton, N.B., Canada
 Email [log in to unmask]

Top of Message | Previous Page | Permalink

Advanced Options


Options

Log In

Log In

Get Password

Get Password


Search Archives

Search Archives


Subscribe or Unsubscribe

Subscribe or Unsubscribe


Archives

September 2019
August 2019
July 2019
June 2019
May 2019
April 2019
March 2019
February 2019
January 2019
November 2018
October 2018
September 2018
August 2018
May 2018
April 2018
March 2018
February 2018
January 2018
December 2017
November 2017
September 2017
June 2017
May 2017
April 2017
March 2017
February 2017
January 2017
December 2016
November 2016
October 2016
September 2016
August 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
April 2016
March 2016
February 2016
January 2016
December 2015
October 2015
September 2015
August 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
April 2015
March 2015
February 2015
January 2015
November 2014
October 2014
September 2014
August 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
April 2014
March 2014
February 2014
January 2014
December 2013
November 2013
October 2013
September 2013
June 2013
May 2013
April 2013
March 2013
January 2013
December 2012
November 2012
October 2012
September 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
April 2012
March 2012
February 2012
January 2012
December 2011
November 2011
October 2011
September 2011
August 2011
July 2011
June 2011
April 2011
March 2011
February 2011
January 2011, Week 1
January 2011
December 2010
October 2010
April 2010
February 2010
January 2010
November 2009
October 2009
September 2009
August 2009
July 2009
June 2009
April 2009
March 2009
February 2009
January 2009
December 2008
November 2008
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005
May 2005
April 2005
March 2005
February 2005
January 2005
December 2004
November 2004
October 2004
September 2004
August 2004
July 2004
June 2004
May 2004
April 2004
March 2004
February 2004
January 2004
December 2003
November 2003
October 2003
September 2003
August 2003
July 2003
June 2003
May 2003
April 2003
March 2003
February 2003
January 2003
December 2002
November 2002
October 2002
September 2002
August 2002
July 2002
June 2002
May 2002
April 2002
March 2002
February 2002
January 2002
December 2001
November 2001
October 2001
September 2001
August 2001
July 2001
June 2001
May 2001
April 2001
March 2001
February 2001
January 2001
December 2000
November 2000
October 2000
September 2000
August 2000
July 2000
June 2000
May 2000
April 2000
March 2000
February 2000
January 2000
December 1999
November 1999
October 1999
September 1999
August 1999
July 1999
June 1999
May 1999
April 1999
March 1999
February 1999
January 1999
December 1998
November 1998
October 1998
September 1998
August 1998
July 1998
June 1998
May 1998
April 1998
March 1998
February 1998
January 1998
December 1997
November 1997
October 1997
September 1997
August 1997
July 1997
June 1997
May 1997
April 1997
March 1997
February 1997
January 1997
December 1996
November 1996
October 1996
September 1996
August 1996
July 1996
June 1996
May 1996
April 1996
March 1996
February 1996
January 1996
December 1995
November 1995
October 1995
September 1995
August 1995
July 1995
June 1995
May 1995
April 1995
March 1995
February 1995
January 1995

ATOM RSS1 RSS2



LISTSERV.UTORONTO.CA

CataList Email List Search Powered by the LISTSERV Email List Manager